Keep the Good. Keep the Bad. Hide the Ugly.

PRO TIP: Don’t skip reading the images. You’ll miss the point. IJS

I am grateful.

I am grateful that I have the opportunity to be the gatekeeper for several brands that I have developed a deep, unwavering love for. It’s akin to that mother lion kind of love. As a Social Media Manager aka Community Manager aka Brand Specialist aka Sprinkler of Social Magic, as I’ve been known to refer to it, I protect my brands’ reputations from social media harm and navigate through those, at times, treacherous waters. And, when I’m doing that, I’m entrenched in the good, bad and incredibly ugly. As you can imagine, that can lead me down a very dark path of reading the underbelly of social media.

I am grateful for the Content Moderators that the big social networks employ. Without you, I would be seeing so much worse, I’m sure. But still. Bad and ugly seeps through those protective barriers that the social networks have created and that’s where I come in. Every day – every moment is different with its unique, emotional ups and downs. Here’s a peek into my life and what I see on a typical day.

I am grateful that this mother’s experience with this cell phone retailer was a positive one when she was going in to do a very mundane task for the worst reason imaginable.

I am grateful that Twister’s last day on Earth was filled with truly heartfelt brushes and pets from this grooming team and that his human kept the sympathy card from one of the hardest moments a pet parent experiences.

I am grateful that I’m reading this sentiment less and less with each year that passes.

I am grateful……. You know what. This is simply ugliness at its core, and I can’t find any way to spin this in a positive way. So, I’m leaving it at that.

You may be asking, WHY. Why would I continue down this path and manage social when there is so much ugliness. It’s simple. I live for the beautiful moments. The opportunities to truly make a difference in a person’s life like when a guest commented that after 12 years of dating she was getting married to her boyfriend the next day and immediately afterwards celebrating at Dave & Buster’s. All she wanted was a drink recommendation from her local D&B.

Immediately, I sent this to Dave & Buster’s and the rest is a happy history. The local team went above and beyond and the Corporate team was so delighted that this couple chose to party at D&B on their big day that they shared the guest’s post on their Brand page.

I live for these moments. It gets me through the hard times of this career. It pushes me to critically assess every engagement and sift through the hundreds of thousands of engagements I read a year to find the human moments and truly celebrate them. I hold those moments close to my heart, use the bad as opportunities to grow and lock the awful away in a mental lockbox knowing that it’s there but not allowing myself to dwell on it too much.

Like I said, I’m grateful. One of the smartest men and a mentor of mine once said to me, “Susie, let’s just keep the good, keep the bad and hide the ugly.” He definitely meant that as a social strategy that I absolutely implement to this day but I also personally live by it so I can continue sprinkling the social magic with a positive attitude.

Why Not Turn on Automated Responses to Reviews/Recommendations?

 

Facebook recently released a tool that makes it easier for brands to manage their online reputation…or did they?

Facebook allows brands to turn on Automated Responses when a customer recommends or leaves a “Doesn’t Recommend” status for a brand.

Brands can create one canned response for “Recommended” and one canned response for “Doesn’t Recommend.”

A typical canned or auto respond goes something like this:

Recommends: “Name, thank you for visiting and leaving a recommendation. We look forward to seeing you again soon.” -Brand Name

Doesn’t Recommend: “Name, we are sorry to hear about your experience. Please click here (customer service link) to let us know more.” -Brand Name

There are endless reasons brands should not automate social interactions. Here are the Top 3 reasons to not automate reputation management.

  1. Accuracy

Every day, we see reviews and recommendations that do not correlate with the star rating, or in Facebook’s case, recommend/doesn’t recommend.

Imagine receiving the “Recommends” response above if you left this review:

 

Or receiving the “Doesn’t Recommend” response above if you left this review:

 

2. Sensitivity

We live in a time where social media tends to be the easiest way for consumers to communicate positive and negative experiences with brands.

At Stellar Digital, we have read reviews left for clients that are posted during or immediately after a fight, shooting or another scary & sensitive encounter. Consumers find it easier and intuitive to post on social than to call an 800 number or fill out a contact form on a website.

3. Authenticity

Having the same response for every single review is lazy and ingenuine. Consumer behavior is to read reviews before visiting an establishment or leaving their own review.

We have seen consumers leave a review and copy and paste the brand’s canned response before the brand has a chance to – mocking them and publicly acknowledging they know the brand won’t care, but they still want others to read about their experience.

People who leave reviews often outline their experience with details and leave suggestions or ask questions. Providing a canned response without reading the review implies that the brand lacks empathy for their consumers’ experience or has bots responding.

The solution!

  • Work with your customer service team to create social media-friendly responses.
  • Make it a priority to read and respond to all reviews at least once a day.
  • If you don’t have the resources or bandwidth, the Stellar Digital team can help you get started!

In the end, consumers are your most powerful marketing team. They deserve more than automated, ingenuine responses.

source: https://sproutsocial.com/insights/data/q3-2017/